Make an impression - The Classroom Partnership teaching agency

Make an impression that lasts a lifetime

Teachers and education professionals leave a lasting impression on the students under their care. These lasting impressions can last a lifetime and we all have fond memories of the teachers and staff during our school years.

Celebrating great teachers

The ‘Make an impression that lasts a lifetime’ campaign by The Classroom Partnership is designed to remind education professionals of the role models that they had in school.

It could be that teacher that made learning Maths interesting, or the teaching assistant that helped you get through English class. It could be the enigmatic science teacher whose passion for particles inspired you to study physics.

Schools are awash with excellent staff and we want to celebrate exactly that in this campaign. The Classroom Partnership works with the finest education staff in the country and we want to celebrate the great teachers that leave lasting impressions on our young students.

Tell us your story

We also want to hear from you. Who inspired you when you were young? Which teachers made a lasting impression that drove you to work in the education sector? Contact us today, we’d love to hear your story.

How long have you been in supply teaching?

First supply day was the first day of term/first day of the school year, straight out of completing my PGCE 11 years ago.

What was your first day like?

Funnily enough, I’d been for an interview for that role and didn’t get it by the end of that day. I was so glad I did not get that class in that school, although they did ask me back.

What advice would you give to a new supply teacher?

Get there early, give yourself time to get a hand-over and find your way around a bit. Always carry a backup lesson.

What is your favourite year group and why?

Year 3 is my favourite. They’re young enough to not be too naughty but old enough to communicate properly

Do you feel part of the school ethos when working on supply?

Ethos varies from school to school. Some make you feel welcome whereas some don’t

What is the hardest part about supply teaching?

Behaviour control when you don’t know kids’ names although you pick up the names of the worst offenders quite quickly.

How long have you been supply teaching?

I first started working as a supply teacher in September 2016. I decided after completing my PGCE that the supply route would help me to identify which year group I would like to teach for my NQT year. This would also increase my experience working in a variety of classroom settings and observing different school plans and routines.

What was your first day as a supply teacher like?

Prior to starting my first day I was a little apprehensive and didn’t know what to expect. From only having experience as a student and knowing I had constant support from a mentor to representing an agency and working independently was a big change. However, by arriving in good time I was able to prepare myself for my first day and familiarise myself with the classroom and staff. Which helped to calm my nerves and gave me the confidence to stick to the schedule provided by the class teacher. This gave me an organised plan but  also allowed me to teach these lessons in my own way. By the end of the day, I couldn’t wait to find out where I was going to be placed next.

What advice would you give to a new supply teacher?

My biggest advice is to create your own day and lesson plans, sticking to one day for each year group as there will be times where no planning is left. However, avoid over preparing too many lessons for each year group especially when a lot of photocopying is required as photocopying facilities are not always available. I made the mistake of looking online and reading any negative comments highlighting the bad experiences, which supply teachers had when left with no resources or day plan. Therefore, I created too many lesson plans for each year group, then when I was left with no planning I struggled to decide which plans in my folder I should select. This made me waste preparation time and added unnecessary stress to my morning. After this experience, I reorganised my folder to show a day plan consisting of one maths, one English and two topic sessions for each year group. When I was placed in a school with no planning again I was able to quickly organise my whole day for the year group I was teaching in 10 minutes.

What is your favourite year group and why?

I enjoy teaching in reception classrooms as the children are often excited to see a new face and it’s nice to get to know the children during the school day. I also enjoy being able to carry out multiple games and activities with the children at the drop of a hat, with either little or no resources at hand.

Do you feel a part of the school ethos when working on supply?

Yes, whenever I arrive at a new school I like to be friendly and often find that schools are really welcoming. It’s nice take some time out to sit in the staffroom with other members of staff and have a friendly conversation over lunch rather than exclude myself to marking books. The staff will always know the children best as they interact with them every day.

What is the hardest part of supply teaching?

Teaching lessons where some children still struggle to complete the task. It is difficult when the subject I’ve been asked to teach is a completely new topic for the children and, I only have one session to ensure that the children have grasped the new concept and understood the lesson fully. As a supply teacher, it can be disheartening and make you feel like you haven’t had the best of days.

How long have you been supply teaching?

About 12 years on and off, about 3 years in total.

What was your first day as a supply teacher like?

The first day was terrifying as I wasn’t given any advice really. I survived and liked the challenge. More experience lead me to want to get qualified.

What advice would you give to a new supply teacher?

Act brave like you know what you are doing even if you don’t. Remember you are the adult in charge. Ask for help if there’s an issue. Don’t expect yourself to know everything as it’s not your school so why would you?

Do you feel a part of the school ethos when working on supply?

Feeling part of the school depends on the staff there and length of the job.

What is the hardest part of supply teaching?

The hardest part is growing a thick enough skin to deal with teachers who look down on you for doing supply. Agencies can vary massively too, TCP is great and very supportive. If you don’t like the agency move on. There are good ones who will look after you and pay you more.

How long have you been in supply teaching?

10 years

What was your first day like?

Nerve racking!  A school in Scholing that had nothing prepared.

What advice would you give to a new supply teacher?

Always take something with you such as worksheets, just in case.

What is your favourite year group and why?

Y2 – old enough to work but still controllable and enthusiastic.

Do you feel part of the school ethos when working on supply?

Completely depends on the school and the staff.

What is the hardest part about supply teaching?

Names! It’s a great help when the TA puts labels on each child.

How long have you been supply teaching?

2 years

What was your first day as a supply teacher like?

Exciting

What advice would you give to a new supply teacher?

Be flexible, have strong classroom management skills, give each class 100% patience and energy and don’t assume that behaviour should be poor just because you’re a supply teacher.

What is your favourite year group and why?

Year 5, they have a bit of attitude but aren’t old enough to be rude (for the most part).

Do you feel a part of the school ethos when working on supply?

I try to act like I’ve been at the school for years, I expect to be treated the same by students as they treat their teachers.

What is the hardest part of supply teaching?

Learning new names and not knowing about the specific needs of each student.

How long have you been supply teaching?

6 months

 

What advice would you give to a new supply teacher?

Try to find out as much as you can about the schools you are teaching in before going there – the more it’s obvious you know, the less the pupils treat you as ‘just supply’.

What is your favourite year group and why?

Year ten – they’re old enough to have a bit of personality about them but most are starting to take a more mature approach towards school and it’s really starting to mean something to them.

Do you feel a part of the school ethos when working on supply?

Depends on the school. I’ve worked in a school where the pupils were terrible but the staff were extremely welcoming and treated me as though I was one of the department, and then worked in another where the pupils were a little better but the staff very much referred to me as ‘that supply teacher’ and treated me as a visitor.

What is the hardest part of supply teaching?

Not knowing exactly where you’ll be for the next upcoming school half term and getting to know some really great teachers and pupils who you’ll then have to leave behind when you leave for a different placement.

Are you ready to make an impression that lasts a lifetime?

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