Thousands of schools in England are struggling financially according to The Association of School and College Leaders (ASCL). It says one-form entry primary and secondary schools will fall off a cliff unless new funds are found.

Malcolm Trobe, interim general secretary of the ASCL said “At some smaller schools, the funding will become such that they would not be able to support their teaching infrastructure.”

One form primary schools typically have about 210 pupils, 65 less than the average sized school. 20% of the UK’s primary schools have less than 200 pupils. Whilst the average sized 11-16 secondary school has about 970 pupils, three form and four form secondary’s have 450 pupils and 600 pupils respectively.

Malcolm Trobe continued. “At some smaller schools, the funding will become such that they would not be able to support their teaching infrastructure.
“They will not be financially viable.
“One-form entry primary schools, and three- to four-form entry secondary schools, are going to find it extremely difficult, especially in low-funded education authorities.”

Education Budgets

As a result of continuing delays to government funding decisions, schools are struggling to provide a full curriculum and maintain the support staff infrastructure.

The Department for Education has argued that the schools budget has been protected and totals £40bn in 2016/17 which is the highest on record.

Speaking about the report, Director of The Classroom Partnership Stephen Emsley said “This is a worrying time for under-funded schools. There is an imbalance between schools in larger authorities. Head teachers are having to look at ways to save save money and are introducing several methods in which to do just that. Schools are finding solutions by sharing specialist teachers with neighbouring schools and others are sharing some of their support services.”